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If You Are Lucky Enough to Know A Quilter, Ask Them to Make You A Mask! 

So says a New York Times article about which materials are the best for non-medical masks. It turns out that the quilting cotton and batiks that we use everyday have among the highest ratings of materials tested. Many of our members have already been making masks for friends and family, despite the varied and contradictory recommendations in the media. With the CDC recommending we all wear a mask when leaving our homes, it is time to collect the best information we can for you, our members.


Pleated mask patterns:  here and here (requested by CHOMP).  Masks may be dropped off from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., Monday through Friday at the hospital’s Cancer Center entrance. A valet will be there so donors do not have to leave their cars

Olson Mask Pattern: 
This pattern (requested by Natividad)

CDC Cloth Face Cover Factsheet and Pattern: here

T-shirt ties
 work well — Cut hem off a washed t-shirt, then cut 1”-1.5” strips horizontally across the bottom. Stretch strip, and either use one long 44” strip or cut strips into 16” pieces.

Making tee shirt "yarn" for ties: 
https://pin.it/323sK63

FaceBook group called Homemade Masks for the Central Coast that supports local needs.

This group is collecting completed masks as well as taking requests for any masks needs. It’s a very well coordinated group effort: sewers, fabric donations, kit makers, drivers, etc. Check Facebook for latest updatesIf you are not on Facebook, email them.

It is critical to emphasize that maintaining 6-feet social distancing remains important to slowing the spread of the virus.  CDC is additionally advising the use of simple cloth face coverings to slow the spread of the virus and help people who may have the virus and do not know it from transmitting it to others.  Cloth face coverings fashioned from household items or made at home from common materials at low cost can be used as an additional, voluntary public health measure.

The cloth face coverings recommended are not surgical masks or N-95 respirators.  Those are critical supplies that must continue to be reserved for healthcare workers and other medical first responders, as recommended by current CDC guidance. From: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/prevent-getting-sick/cloth-face-cover.html



If You Are Lucky Enough to Know A Quilter, Ask Them to Make You A Mask! 

So says a New York Times article about which materials are the best for non-medical masks. It turns out that the quilting cotton and batiks that we use everyday have among the highest ratings of materials tested. Many of our members have already been making masks for friends and family, despite the varied and contradictory recommendations in the media. With the CDC recommending we all wear a mask when leaving our homes, it is time to collect the best information we can for you, our members.


Pleated mask patterns:  here and here (requested by CHOMP).  Masks may be dropped off from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., Monday through Friday at the hospital’s Cancer Center entrance. A valet will be there so donors do not have to leave their cars

Olson Mask Pattern: 
This pattern (requested by Natividad)

CDC Cloth Face Cover Factsheet and Pattern: here

T-shirt ties
 work well — Cut hem off a washed t-shirt, then cut 1”-1.5” strips horizontally across the bottom. Stretch strip, and either use one long 44” strip or cut strips into 16” pieces.

Making tee shirt "yarn" for ties: 
https://pin.it/323sK63

FaceBook group called Homemade Masks for the Central Coast that supports local needs.

This group is collecting completed masks as well as taking requests for any masks needs. It’s a very well coordinated group effort: sewers, fabric donations, kit makers, drivers, etc. Check Facebook for latest updatesIf you are not on Facebook, email them.

It is critical to emphasize that maintaining 6-feet social distancing remains important to slowing the spread of the virus.  CDC is additionally advising the use of simple cloth face coverings to slow the spread of the virus and help people who may have the virus and do not know it from transmitting it to others.  Cloth face coverings fashioned from household items or made at home from common materials at low cost can be used as an additional, voluntary public health measure.

The cloth face coverings recommended are not surgical masks or N-95 respirators.  Those are critical supplies that must continue to be reserved for healthcare workers and other medical first responders, as recommended by current CDC guidance. From: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/prevent-getting-sick/cloth-face-cover.html



If You Are Lucky Enough to Know A Quilter, Ask Them to Make You A Mask! 

So says a New York Times article about which materials are the best for non-medical masks. It turns out that the quilting cotton and batiks that we use everyday have among the highest ratings of materials tested. Many of our members have already been making masks for friends and family, despite the varied and contradictory recommendations in the media. With the CDC recommending we all wear a mask when leaving our homes, it is time to collect the best information we can for you, our members.


Pleated mask patterns:  here and here (requested by CHOMP).  Masks may be dropped off from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., Monday through Friday at the hospital’s Cancer Center entrance. A valet will be there so donors do not have to leave their cars

Olson Mask Pattern: 
This pattern (requested by Natividad)

CDC Cloth Face Cover Factsheet and Pattern: here

T-shirt ties
 work well — Cut hem off a washed t-shirt, then cut 1”-1.5” strips horizontally across the bottom. Stretch strip, and either use one long 44” strip or cut strips into 16” pieces.

Making tee shirt "yarn" for ties: 
https://pin.it/323sK63

FaceBook group called Homemade Masks for the Central Coast that supports local needs.

This group is collecting completed masks as well as taking requests for any masks needs. It’s a very well coordinated group effort: sewers, fabric donations, kit makers, drivers, etc. Check Facebook for latest updatesIf you are not on Facebook, email them.

It is critical to emphasize that maintaining 6-feet social distancing remains important to slowing the spread of the virus.  CDC is additionally advising the use of simple cloth face coverings to slow the spread of the virus and help people who may have the virus and do not know it from transmitting it to others.  Cloth face coverings fashioned from household items or made at home from common materials at low cost can be used as an additional, voluntary public health measure.

The cloth face coverings recommended are not surgical masks or N-95 respirators.  Those are critical supplies that must continue to be reserved for healthcare workers and other medical first responders, as recommended by current CDC guidance. From: https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/prevent-getting-sick/cloth-face-cover.html